Rosie the Riveter Memorial

  • Rosie-the-Riveter-Memorial-WWP

Place Category: Memorial & StatuePlace Tags: Places in CA and SF Bay Area Places

  • Description
    Rosie the Riveter Memorial

    A monument at the Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park commemorating the “Rosies” – the women laborers who worked in the shipyards during World War II. This is the first national memorial honoring the contribution of women in the home front.

    The monument, designed by visual artist Susan Schwartzenberg and landscape architect/environmental sculptor Cheryl Barton, is a ship’s keel length walkway inscribed with the home front timeline and quotations of female workers. A sculpture, in the form of a ship being built, displaying letters, photographs, and other memorabilia of women laborers from all over the country.

    Learn about the women workforce during these crucial times and discover the challenges they faced, including hazardous working conditions, shortages of childcare, food rationing, and gender discrimination.

    Rosie the Riveter Memorial established due to the campaign of Chairwoman Donna Powers. She was inspired by the stories she heard about women’s labor during WW2. With the help of the historian Donna Graves, the monument, and afterward the park itself, became the first National Historical Park to memorialize the efforts of the women workforce of the home front.



  • More Info
    Theme:
    • Army and Security Forces
    • History
    Address: 1414 Harbour Way S #3000, Richmond, CA 94804
    Free admission
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    Rosie the Riveter Memorial

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  • Photo credit - National Park Service

  • Rosie the Riveter Memorial

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    Original Rosie the Riveters' visit WWII Memorial

    Over 30 of the original Rosie the Riveters' from Detroit, Michigan visited the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C. Watch this video for details.

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