Women Are Persons! Monument

  • Women-Are-Persons-Monument-WWP

Place Category: Memorial & StatuePlace Tags: Places in ON Canada

  • Description
    Women Are Persons! Monument

    ‘Women Are Persons!’ is a monument dedicated to the ‘famous five’ – Louise McKinney, Irene Parlby, Emily Murphy, Henrietta Muir Edwards, and Nellie McClung, who fought to change the legal term of ‘persons’ in Canada, which until 1929 didn’t consider women as such.
    Because of that definition, women couldn’t be appointed to the Senate.

    The monument, created by Barbara Paterson in 2000, is the first one on Parliament Hill to memorialize Canadian women.

    The statues depict the women in their moment of victory, wearing plain dresses and standing on the ground and not pedestals, emphasizing that those were ordinary women that had the strength to change the world.

    The empty chair invites you to interact with them as well as to inspire you to take a stand on your own beliefs.

    A replica of this statue is located at 8 Ave SE, Calgary, Alberta ,Canada.
    Another statue of the ‘famous five’ by Helen Granger Young is located at the grounds of Manitoba Legislature in Winnipeg, Canada.



  • More Info
    Theme:
    • Activism and Feminism
    • Law
    • Politics and Leaders
    Address: Near the East Block on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa, Canada
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    Women Are Persons! Monument

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  • Photo credit - WWP team

  • Women Are Persons! Monument

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    Did You Know? - The Famous Five and the Persons Case

    They've been called visionaries, feminists, trailblazers and Canadian heroes- Emily Murphy, Henrietta Muir Edwards, Louise McKinney, Irene Parlby and Nellie McClung changed the Canadian political landscape forever. They fought to be recognized as persons under the law. On October 18th, 1929, after an arduous legal and political battle the British Privy Council recognized women as persons under the BNA Act.

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